Isaiah 43:19

680c60_02f37878ce8a8e3e301065ead6daf435“Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.”

Years ago, while serving as a pastor in Northern Minnesota, I was asked by our district president to assist a local congregation with a study on mission planning. They were between pastors and it was time to look at their mission. During a break in our sessions, a gentleman on the church council of that congregation confided in me over a cup of coffee. He said, “Pastor, I don’t really know why we are bothering with this. I like our church just the way it is.”

I understood his reluctance to change. After many years of membership in that small-town church with one pastor, the idea of embarking into new areas of mission was an uncomfortable prospect.

Similar comments can be heard in many congregations. Looking, really looking at a congregation’s life and mission can be sobering and challenging. Comfort zones can be hard to leave and things put in place in previous years by the church may need to be undone or modified to serve the current mission needs of the church. Complacency can lead to obstructionism as church members attempt to hang on to a past that is no longer relevant to the present mission requirements of the congregation.

We are in the season of Pentecost, that time of the Church year when we deliberately focus on the life of the church in the light of the ongoing work of the Holy Spirit. Pentecost reminds us that the work of the Church is God’s work, after all. The mission is God’s mission and we have no right to make of it our private enterprise, serving our needs only. When we resist change, however sincere our intentions, we must account for the possibility that we are resisting the work of the Holy Spirit, Whose work among us is not to keep us comfortable but faithful.

Pentecost is God’s call to us through His Living Word that we may dare to welcome the new breezes which are blowing, not as threatening portents of an approaching storm but as that new and renewing breath of life which the Holy Spirit most surely brings – that God’s work may be done.

 

“May the peace of God that passes all understanding keep your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

 

 

 

 

 

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